Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Be Careful Out There!

Microsoft has some wonderful information on their website. Here is an example of that.

Seniors Stay Safer on the Internet

This information came from a brochure that Microsoft has online. It is called Defending Your Computer. They have a number of these out there that you can download as PDF files.

So, when you have time, I recommend this website: http://www.microsoft.com/security/resources/brochures.aspx

Here is information from one of those brochures:

1.Defend your computer.

  • Keep all software (including your web browser) current with automatic updating. Install legitimate antivirus and antispyware software. Protect your wireless router with a password, and use flash drives cautiously. Microsoft can help: microsoft.com/security/pypc.aspx.

2. Guard email and other accounts with strong passwords.

  • Make them long (phrases or sentences) that mix uppercase and lowercase letters, numbers, and symbols. (Learn how: aka.ms/passwords-create.)
  • Avoid using the same password everywhere. If it is stolen, all the accounts it protects are at risk. It’s okay to store passwords on a well-protected piece of paper away from your computer.

3. Use email more safely.

Spot signs of fraud:
  • Watch out for surprise messages that you have "won a lottery," need to send money to your "grandchild," or help a distant stranger "transfer funds." Other clues include notices of account closure, misspellings, and grammatical errors.

Think before you respond to an email:

  • Don’t trust the sender’s name. It can be faked.
  • Be cautious about clicking links to video or opening photos, songs, or other files — even if you know the sender. Check with him or her first.
  • Be wary of visiting a website or calling the number in a suspect message. They could be phony. Instead, contact the company using info you find yourself.
  • Be careful what you put in email. It’s as insecure 
    Make sure you’re at the correct site — for example, at your bank’s website, not a fake.
    Look for a web address with https ("s" stands for secure) and a closed padlock beside it. (The lock might also be in the lower right of the window.) as a postcard.

4. Browse more safely.

Look for signs that a webpage is secure:

  • Make sure you’re at the correct site — for example, at your bank’s website, not a fake.
  • Look for a web address with https ("s" stands for secure) and a closed padlock beside it. (The lock might also be in the lower right of the window.)

Don't type sensitive information in pop-up windows.

5. Use social networks more safely

Decide how public you want your profile or blog to be.

When using a social network website like Facebook or Eons or posting opinions on your own webpages (blogging), consider that some sites automatically make what you post open to anyone on the Internet.

Look for Settings or Options to manage who can see your profile, photos, and friends, how people can search for you, who can comment, and how to block unwanted access.

Think before you post

Before you post anything online, remember that the site may archive what you post, friends may give it out, or hackers and security lapses may expose it.

  • Don’t post anything — especially sensitive information like your address or birth date — you would ordinarily say only to a close friend.
  • Use caution when sharing feelings — whether you are happy, sad, angry, or have money worries— because predators may exploit your emotions.

This website is an excellent resource for all of us, but especially for beginners!

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

This is a good sight. Wish I could get me to read all of it! Jack

Anonymous said...

Excellent advice! I'll visit the microsoft site. Heidi B.